Rosemary (Rosmarinus oficinalis)

The Rosemary in my garden is looking great at the moment, fresh, fragrant and beautifully green 🙂

Later this month I intend to take some cuttings, so that I can have more of this yummy herb next year in the garden.

Native habitat

  • Mediterranean and other parts of Europe
  • Introduced mainly in Southern England

Growing conditions

  • Light, dry, sandy soil
  • Sunny position

Maintenance

  • Protect young plants from frost
  • Gather flowering tips in spring and summer and hang in bunches to dry
  • Trim bush in the autumn

Parts used

  • Flowering tops
  • Leaves

Properties

  • Pungent scent
  • Moth repellent
  • Attracts bees

Uses

  • Culinary, cosmetic and medicinal
  • Flavours food, especially soups, stews, vegetables and grilled lamb
  • Used in jellies, jams, biscuits and cakes
  • A protection against clothes moths
  • Tonic for invalids; for depression, anxiety and nervous migraine
  • Antiseptic, used externally to heal wounds and mouth infections
  • To preserve teeth
  • As a cough cure
  • To soothe bruises, falls and sprains
  • To keep you young

Some Facts 🙂

  • Name comes from the Latin ros-marinus (dew of the sea), which refers to its favourite habit by salty sea spray
  • A symbol of friendship and love
  • A wreath of rosemary was worn by brides as a sign of love and loyalty
  • Once used in religious ceremonies to ward of evil spirits
  • Pungent scent was believed to protect from disease and infection
  • Used as an alternative to incense
  • Ancient Greeks believed it improved memory
  • Greek students used to wear a wreath while sitting examinations
  • Introduced into Britain by Romans

Information courtest of The Herb Society

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3 thoughts on “Rosemary (Rosmarinus oficinalis)

  1. I was almost going to write something about point 3 of maintenance but I will restrain myself..
    Rosemary is such a great plant tho’ and don’t the bees love it?

  2. Hi Jane…

    This plant has yet to flower, so no bee’s buzzing round it yet..

    They are however, going mad for my marjoram which is flowering like mad at the moment. I might just write up on that one next

    Poont 3 Maintenance… no need to restrain, i’d love to hear your thoughts 🙂

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