Purple Toadflax (Linaria Purpurea)

Purple Toadflax (Linaria Purpurea) growing happily away in my garden providing the bumble bees with plenty of food at the moment

  • Perennial, flowering June to August. Height 2 – 3 ft (60 – 90 cm).
  • Slender spikes of purple flowers – looks like Lavender from a distance!
  • Sun. Drought-tolerant and self-seeds well.
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Red Campion (Silene dioica)

This gorgeous little purpley pink flower is in abundance at the moment all along the hedgerows, I snapped these pics when we were out walking the dogs the other night, and today when we were driving up to visit the in-laws my hubby noticed that there is loads of it growing this year and had asked if I knew what it was…

Common Name: Red campion
Genus: Silene
Species: dioica
Skill Level: Beginner
Exposure: Partial shade, Shade
Hardiness: Hardy
Soil type: Well-drained/lightClay/heavy,Chalky/alkalineDryMoist
Height: 30cm
Spread: 30cm

This little pinky-red meadow flower is often found in the wild growing in woodlands and in the verges of country roads. It’s easy to grow and makes a good addition to a rockery or semi-shaded patch in need of some colour. The clump-forming plant is hardy and will tolerate most soils, although it can struggle to cope with very acid ground. It has rich green leaves that appear in spring, and has a long flowering period right through until the start of autumn. It’s a low-maintenance plant that only needs dividing later in the year if it has become too large. It’s also fairly pest-free, and doesn’t seem to attract much attention from slugs and snails.

This info is courtesy of the bbc website (here)

Pink Flowers

I bought myself some flowers at the weekend…  to add a splash of colour in the house now that everything is dying away outside for the onset of winter..

I thought that I would post this picture today,  the weather outside is absolutely dreadful, gale force winds and torrential rain… it’s just sooooo horrid…. stay safe everyone

 

Nasturtium – Maharajah Mixed (Tropaeolum Majus)

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When I was in my local Garden Centre yesterday, I picked up some Nasturtium seeds, and chose the variety “Maharajah Mixed”

They were sown direct into the garden, the spot I chose for them was along the boundary fence, right next door to this is my eglu, so I think the chickens will appreciate a lovely splash of colour this summer 🙂

Nastrurtiums do best in poor soils and without feesing.   Flowers and foliage are edible and good in salads… so we can add a splash of colour in our summer salads too 🙂

  • Flowering Time : June/September
  • Cost £1.49 per packet
  • Planted : Saturday 25th April 2009

How the Veggies are progressing…

A bit of a mixed reaction with the growing season so far… it started out great, lovely and warm, then it kinda went downhill after that.. its not been that sunny and it has rained a fair bit, and I think this has had an impact on the veggies growing both in the greenhouse and in the garden.

Here is an up to date report on some of the veggies growing in my garden..

First of all the peas… I have some planted straight into the garden and also some growing in a trough on the high wall..

Both were sown inside the greenhouse then planted out about 2 weeks apart, the result for both is that they have grown about 10 – 12 inches tall (not really that big), they have produced pea pods, but not that many of them, I’d be lucky if there was enough to serve up onto one plate let along freeze a bag of them so we could enjoy them in winter.. so verdict on the peas 1/10 really disappointed.

Now on to the tomatoes in the greenhouse… I have around 10 plants all seemingly doing well but not a lot of fruits, in fact I had to take 2 off the plant this morning as they had blossom end rot, I always remember my dad moaning about it when I lived at home, cursing the blossom end rot lol, now i’ve got it!

The micro tom tomatoes… I dont think I will be growing these again, for me, its a bit of a messy looking plant and the fruits are too close to the soil.

 

The Potatoes are doing really well (I think)!   Grown in big spud bags, they should be ready to harvest quite soon.

Next… the onions, I’m not sure if they are doing well or not to be honest, I would have expected them to be bigger than they are, but we shall wait and see what happens..

The Carrots seem to be doing ok, must get some weeding done this weekend before the weeds take over..

Courgettes… well they seem to be doing just grand, in full blom at the moment, here’s hoping I get fruit this year, last year they rotted away just after forming because it was soooo wet.

I have some flowers growing in the garden too, which are adding a lovely splash of colour….

 

 

 

A Trip Down Memory Lane….

I took the kids to Pittencrieff Park in Dunfermline today, and it truely was a trip down memory lane for me, I used to live in Dunfermline for 24 years until I got married and moved away to the village where I now live..

Many a time my friends and I would spend time down the glen, long summer holidays spent there.   Some of it still remains the same as I remember it, the only real big change is the animal enlosure, now boarded up and closed down, which is a great shame.

At the bottom of the glen, which lies at the foot of the Old Dunfermline Palace, there are lots of caves and hiding places, some with historical interest… like Wallace’s Well

 

Just along the path from Wallace’s Well is this lovely bridge….

Pittencrieff Park or “The Glen” as it is known affectionately by the local populace extends to 76 acres and was given in trust by Andrew Carnegie to the people of his birthplace, Dunfermline.

Before it was purchased in 1902, by Andrew Carnegie, Pittencrieff Park formed the estate and grounds of the house, owned by the lairds of Pittencrieff. 

Pittencrieff House Museum

Pittencrieff House Museum is a historic house with a difference. The 17th century shell has a 20th century interior. Although there is no furniture, there are 3 display galleries with beautifully plastered ceilings. Here you can begin to discover, among other things, the history of “Dunfermline Toon”, who was Dunfermline’s giant and what clothes were worn in those days. The story of the house reveals a number of owners, the last of whom was Andrew Carnegie. He never lived in the house however, and eventually gave it to the citizens of Dunfermline.

Formal Gardens

  

Laid out, colourfully in front of the Glass Hall conservatory is a Formal Garden. In days gone by this area was used by Pittencrieff House as a kitchen garden and orchard. Now developed round the laird’s walk with its own breathtaking vistas of the Abbey and Palace ruins, the garden is a kaleidoscope of colour throughout the spring and summer. It is a peaceful, relaxing setting in which to idle away the afternoon in the warmth of a summer sun.

Greenhouses

Completing the formal gardens is the 200ft Glass Hall conservatory. Built in 1973 on the site of the old conservatories the present structure is divided into three sections. The main area with its wooden bridge over the running stream and its regal display of flowers creates for the visitor an entire new world, the exotic plant world. Distributed throughout the three areas the visitor can see on exhibit plants from many countries. Look out too for the exhibit which features the fossilised trees.

We took a wander around the formal gardens which were full of beautiful flowers….

     

  

  

  

From the formal garden you can look over towards Dunfermline Abbey..

  

I enjoyed my trip down Menory Lane 🙂

Peony Roses ..

On Friday, I took a trip to my local supermarket to get a few provisions in… and right at the front door, there stood a couple of buckets with reduced price flowers in them..

I wandered over and took a peek to see if I could find a bargin and also a treat for myself, seeing as I absolutely adore flowers..

I was lucky enough to find this bunch of Peonies marked down to 30p from a staggering £5.99!

Don’t you just love a bargin 🙂

Spring Daffodils

Spring Daffodils

Originally uploaded by T o w n i e

When we were out and about today I stopped & rolled down the car window to take this picture.

It caught my eye immediately and I think its absolutely gorgeous, the sloping hill in the distance with the trees and little stone dyke right through to the big clump of daffodils underneath the fence to the foreground.

🙂 Spring has sprung …